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Author Topic: How to test the IQ of a computer (Artificial Intelligence)  (Read 1956 times)

eureka

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How to test the IQ of a computer (Artificial Intelligence)
« on: January 03, 2012, 02:59:20 AM »

A hundred years since the birth of Alan Turing, his famous benchmark for machine intelligence is both too hard and too narrow, but there's another way.

At the 2011 Loebner prize competition chatbots failed to convince judges that they were human. The contest is based on the Turing test, the most famous benchmark of machine intelligence.

2012 is the centenary of the birth of Alan Turing, the second world war code-breaker who dreamed up the test in 1950 while pondering the notion of a thinking machine, so expect a flurry of competitions in his honor. Bear in mind, though, that the Turing test is a poor gauge for today's AIs. For one thing, the test's demand that a program capture the nuances of human speech makes it too hard. At the same time, it is too narrow: with bots influencing the stock market, landing planes and poised to start driving cars, why focus only on linguistic smarts?

One alternative is a suite of mini Turing tests each designed to evaluate machine intelligence in a specific arena. For example, a newly created visual Turing test assesses a bot's ability to understand the spatial relationships between objects in an image against that of a human.

Others want to stop using humans as the benchmark. Using a universal, mathematical definition of intelligence, it could soon be possible to score people and computers on a scale untainted by human bias. Such universal tests should even be able to spot a bot that is far smarter than a human.

The Turing test is the most famous benchmark of artificial intelligence, but it is flawed. Now an addition that gauges a machine's visual skills has been proposed.

"It has served its purpose. Now we need Turing Test 2.0," says Aladdin Ayesh, who organised a symposium entitled Towards a Comprehensive Intelligence Test at the AI and Simulated Biology conference in York, UK, in April.

That's why Michael Barclay and Antony Galton at the University of Exeter, UK, and colleagues have created a test that asks machines to mimic some of our visual abilities.

Click here to take the interactive visual Turing test yourself.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2012, 03:46:21 AM by eureka »
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